Tag Archives: social wellness

Scrapbooking is more than cutting and pasting!

Mei Kameda, Keiro Intern

Click clack and smile! Photography is one of the greatest technologies that has been invented to store memories and warm one’s heart. But do you ever wonder how to store all these pictures that have been taken for many years? Well, I have a fun solution for you: scrapbooking. According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, a scrapbook is a “blank book in which various items (as newspaper clippings or pictures) are collected and preserved.” The idea of scrapbooking began in the 15th century and became popular in England due to its booklet form. In the United States it became popular in the early ‘80s. The industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 and it became one of America’s favorite ways of enjoying arts and crafts.

Scrapbooking is Good for the Soul

I’ve been scrapbooking for years and it’s a lot of fun! Not only does it entertain me, but it is also therapeutic. You may wonder why it’s good for the soul. Did you know that art has been proven to provide a healthy environment and put many people at ease? I chose scrapbooking in particular because it allows me to draw, cut, paste, and create my own, one-of-a-kind booklet.  It also includes photographs of familiar faces, events, and nostalgic memories that make me feel happy.

I love scrapbooking. Since I enjoy taking photos, I have hundreds of them on my hard drive that in the past, I did not know what to do with. Then I began scrapbooking. Not only does it give me the satisfaction of completing a project, but it also is enjoyable and relaxing for me as I make it, as well as when I look back at the wonderful memories from the past.

Getting Creative

The only downside about scrapbooking is that it is expensive! If you go to arts and crafts stores like Michael’s or Jo-Ann’s, booklets cost over $10. It’s a lot of money in the long run if you are an avid scrapbooker. Then you add stickers, markers, glitter, and printing. Luckily, there are ways to save money and enjoy your own scrapbooks! For instance, if you take colored construction paper, three-hole punches, and some ribbons, you can make a colorful and creative booklet. As for other supplies, Target has many festive and generic stickers for 99 cents and can print pictures for 10 cents a photo – what a deal!

Scrapbook supply checklist:

  • Construction paper + three whole punches + ribbons (or get a pre-made booklet)
  • Glue
  • Double-sided tape (this works better than glue to maintain a clean look!)
  • Markers, pens
  • Stickers, magazine cut-outs, newspaper cut outs, glitter
  • Photos (you can print them at home or ask stores to print for you)
  • Quotes that are relevant to the event

sample scrapbook for IHA

This is a great project for people of any age. It is also a wonderful way to bring people together and share fabulous memories!

Scrapbooks are great for gifts too!

Mei Kameda is an intern for Keiro Senior HealthCare. She is currently pursuing her Bachelor of Science degree from California State University, Long Beach in Health Science and Communication Studies. She loves to exercise, cook, and do arts and crafts!

The material presented on this site is for informational purposes only and does not necessarily represent the opinions of Keiro Senior HealthCare, The Institute for Healthy Aging at Keiro, or its contributors. Readers should consult appropriate health, legal, or financial professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being. Full disclaimer

If you enjoyed this article, click the “like” button below!

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It's Obon Season!

Children's Performance at Nishi Obon, July 9-10

Volunteering at Obon

Being involved in community activities is a great way to socialize and stay genki! Karen Escano of Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist Temple (one of Keiro’s Nikkei Senior Network member organizations) talks about her volunteer experience at this year’s obon carnival.  

On July 9 and 10, the members of the Los Angeles Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist Temple held their annual Obon Carnival. It was the culmination of months of planning and preparation. To be a part of Nishi’s Obon celebration is something one has to experience to appreciate. While remembering our loved ones who have sadly passed away, side-by-side with friends and family, there is a sense of “oneness” as everyone works together. It has been reported that during our Obon carnival, there are at least 200 people hard at work.  Whether they are in a booth, the kitchen, directing cars in our parking lot, or making sure we have toilet paper in our bathrooms, the efforts are endless. Everyone simply wants to do what they can to make it easier and more enjoyable for others. The contributions of Nishi members are numerous, and whether it be in the form of the delicious osushi made by the Fujinkai women, whose members range in ages 50 to 90 years, to the sweet song and dance performed by the Nishi Development Center children, who are between the ages of 2 and 5, the sense of pride and selflessness are evident.

A Community Effort

This year, as in years past, we were fortunate to have thousands in attendance. Guests were able to enjoy a variety of food and drink items, (the boba and dango were amazing!), games, cultural exhibits and demonstrations as well as entertainment. This year, our guest MC was Mr. Rodney Kageyama. We were thrilled that he was able to join us in welcoming The San Fernando Hongwanji Buddhist Temple Choir, The Taiko Project, Kotobuki no Kai, LA Matsuri Daiko, and Matsutoyo Kai, to name a few, during our entertainment segment. Our objective in providing entertainment at our Obon carnival is two-fold; one, to provide a lighthearted atmosphere for our guests and two, to provide our hardworking members a slight distraction from their efforts. We are always humbled and very grateful to the talented performers who donate their time to be with us.

We hope that if you were able to join us this year that you had a memorable time, and if you were not, please plan to do so next year. The energy that our members put forth in celebration of Obon each year is truly amazing.

As a side note, when I was approached (begged) to write this article, my immediate response was “okay,” not knowing until hours later that it would require more brain power than I might actually have, and that I was probably not very qualified to do so.  However, having said that, I am glad that I was asked as it has given me an opportunity to reflect on the significance of Obon and the ability to express how meaningful it is to be a part of something so very special.

Karen is a member of the Board of Directors for Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist Temple.  She has served as past president of both the Adult Buddhist Association (ABA) and the Dharma School Parents for the Temple. For the past four years she has served as co-chair of the Obon Entertainment Committee.


The material presented on this site is for informational purposes only and does not necessarily represent the opinions of Keiro Senior HealthCare, The Institute for Healthy Aging at Keiro, or its contributors. Readers should consult appropriate health, legal, or financial professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.  Full disclaimer

If you enjoyed this article, click the “like” button below!

Summer Travels…

 

Kanako Kusano, Keiro Staff Member & Jimi Hendrix

Weekend  Getaway to Seattle and Portland (click on link to see some great pictures!)

Ever since Lauryn joined The Institute for Aging at Keiro, she has been talking about how beautiful her home town, Seattle, is and how much she misses it. So, last weekend, I decided to visit and see for myself.

A Seafood Lover’s Dream

Lauryn was right – I fell in love with the city right away! There were tall green trees, water, bridges, and fresh seafood. I had clam chowder for lunch, fresh oysters for a snack, and crab for dinner. The city is a dream for a seafood lover.  Pike Place Market is great for anyone who enjoys going to farmers markets filled with fresh seafood, colorful fruits and vegetables, and beautiful flowers.  I was really disappointed that I could not bring the flowers home since they wouldn’t stay fresh. Instead, I began dreaming about living by the market and walking there to buy fresh flowers and seafood every morning… That would be my ideal lifestyle!

Other than food and the market, we enjoyed the nice views from the Gas Works Park and Alki Beach.  Also, at the Chittenden Locks, I was impressed by the canal system to keep the fresh water from the seawater, as well as human technology to preserve the ecological system for salmon by creating a  fish ladder

Concordia University, Portland

On the third day, we drove to Portland, Oregon. There was a reason why I wanted to visit there; I spent a summer at Concordia University, Portland to study ELS about 20 years ago. That was my first experience in the U.S. It was a small private college with only two or three buildings on a huge campus located in a quiet residential neighborhood.

However, it has changed so much. Now there are many more buildings with a beautiful, brand new library. Much of the empty yard has been converted to parking areas. The old dormitory where I stayed was also converted to an administration building. All of a sudden, I was having mixed feelings of nostalgia, disappointment, and excitement.  I felt disappointed since I was expecting to recall memories of summer days, but it did not happen as the campus had changed so much. At the same time, I was proud of the school for expanding.

A Moment of Realization

While I was having such mixed feelings, I saw foreign students coming out of ELS classes, which reminded me of when I was just like one of them. Twenty years later, I was in the same place again only to realize that I met so many people in those years, each who supported me when I needed it. I was feeling overwhelmingly grateful for every single person in my life since I wouldn’t have been here if I hadn’t met them. 

I love traveling, whether it’s to a new place or the same old place that I’ve been many times.  There’s always something I discover about the place and myself.

Kanako Kusano, a Health Promotion Specialist at The Institute for Healthy Aging at Keiro, was born and raised in Urawa, Japan.  Upon graduating from a high school, she came to California  to fulfill her dream of becoming a social worker.  She has been working for Keiro Senior HealthCare for 11 years.

The material presented on this site is for informational purposes only and does not necessarily represent the opinions of Keiro Senior HealthCare, The Institute for Healthy Aging at Keiro, or its contributors. Readers should consult appropriate health, legal, or financial professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.  Full disclaimer

If you enjoyed this article, click the “like” button below!

 

Celebrating 50 Years of Service…

South Bay Keiro Nursing Home Volunteer Awardees

Oh, what a morning!  On Wednesday our Keiro staff had the pleasure of being surrounded by 250 of our wonderful volunteers at the annual Keiro Volunteer Appreciation Brunch.  Held at Almansor Court in Alhambra, the morning started out with a bit of rain, but blossomed into a beautiful event where volunteers were able to meet with old friends, eat lots of food and be recognized for their dedication and service to our community.

There was plenty of chatter throughout the room as volunteers were able ” to see how many volunteers there were [are] and to meet good friends!”  Many commented that the event was a “very friendly and warm gathering,” and that it was “very relaxing and a great time to enjoy with fellow volunteers, eating delicious food!”
 

One volunteer stated, “As we celebrate 50 years of service, the atmosphere was charged with much happiness and anticipation as the entire community anticipates another 50 years of not only service alone, but that there will always be Keiro into the future years.”

Keiro Senior HealthCare would not be what it is today without the tremendous support of the community and the countless hours so generously given by our volunteers.  We thank you all from the bottom of our hearts and look forward to the next 50 years!
 
We would love to have you join our Keiro Volunteer Family!  If you are interested, please contact Kimberly Hayashi at khayashi@keiro.org or at (323) 980-2352.